Andromeda Galaxy

Andromeda Galaxy

Solar system

Andromeda Galaxy

Andromeda Galaxy – The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral rod galaxy 2.5 million light-years from Earth. This galaxy is also known as Messiah 31. A new paper by researchers at the University of Colorado in the Astrophysical Journal Letters suggests a new formation mechanism for nuclear disks similar to the Andromeda Galaxy through gravitational waves. When astronomers first looked at Andromeda, they expected to see a total black hole. Surrounded by relatively symmetrical clusters of stars, but instead found that the galaxy’s stars did not orbit symmetrically around the center of the galaxy, but rather as an elongated circle. That’s why scientists have used computer simulations to find out what happened between the two black holes in the galaxy when they collided with each other. The simulations show that the force released due to the merger of the two primary black holes The galaxy has changed the orbits of the stars, bringing them closer to the center of the galaxy, creating the current shape of the Andromeda galaxy.

In fact, when two galaxies merge, their supermassive black holes merge to form a single black hole. The question for scientists has been, what are the consequences of this merger? They now find that the force released by this merger could affect the formation of stars in the galaxy. When galaxies collide, their black holes rotate around each other, and this rotation gradually becomes faster and faster until the two black holes merge. In this process, huge pulses of gravitational waves are generated, which carry with them a lot of torque that can affect anything. Scientists have wanted to know what effect these waves can have at a distance of about 3.3 light-years from the center of the galaxy. does not have. However, the available torque can move the remnants of a large mass black hole at speeds of several million kilometers per hour. The black hole’s rapid motion could cause it to leave the galaxy, but since it did not leave the galaxy, it was able to change the orbits of the surrounding stars. So the main reason for the strange formation of stars in the Andromeda Galaxy is the effect they got from the galaxy’s central black hole.

Andromeda Galaxy

In the 1920s, this distant galaxy was part of a major debate between two American astronomers, Harlow Shapley and Heber Curtis. At the time, astronomers thought that the Milky Way encompassed the entire universe and found strange parts called nebulae inside it. Heber Curtis recorded several constellations in Andromeda, arguing that Andromeda itself was a separate galaxy. variable) in the Andromeda Galaxy, continued. Cephalic delta variable stars have properties that can be used to measure their exact distance. In the stars of this category, there is a definite relationship between absolute magnitude and the period of light rotation that can be used to determine the distance. Earlier, Harlow Chapley had succeeded in determining that the Milky Way galaxy is 100,000 light-years long. Edwin Hubble’s further calculations showed that the identified variable star was further away from us and did not fit in the Milky Way galaxy. Edwin Hubble went on to use his Doppler measurements of galaxies to show that the universe was expanding. In the 1940s, the distance to Andromeda doubled, when the German astronomer Walter Baade became the first one was able to observe stars in the central region of the galaxy. He also found two different types of stars in the Cephalus delta. After the detection of radio waves by Hanbury Brown and Cyril Hazard at the Jordelbank Observatory in the 1950s, Andromeda radio maps were drawn.

Recent NGC Discoveries 224
As we dig deeper into the universe in recent years, we have found the size of Andromeda larger. In 2015, observations by the Hubble Space Telescope showed that the halo of matter surrounding Andromeda was six times larger and 1,000 times more massive than we had ever measured. At the time, astronomers suggested that the Milky Way galaxy might be the same. It has an aura, and perhaps the aura of the two galaxies has already begun to merge. This issue originated in 2005 and 2007 when the size of the galaxy was revised based on observations of stars and their motions.

Superstars in Van Andromeda
Night sky photographers Bob and Janice Fera captured the image of NGC 206 superstars in the Andromeda Galaxy between September 17 and 19, 2012 at the Eagle Ridge Observatory in Firsthall, California. The two observed the superstar using a 14-inch Officina Stellare telescope with a flat two-element flat telescope, using An Apogee Alta U16M CCD camera and Astrodon filters. (Credit: Bob / Janice Fera)

Why is the earth round?

In 2015, scientists used a mosaic of images from the Hubble Space Telescope to publish the most detailed image of the Andromeda Galaxy. Composed of 7,398 pieces taken from 411 different telescope angles, the image shows more than 100 million stars, dust structures, and other features in the Andromeda Galaxy. At the time, scientists said the image could be used to infer Arrived from the structure of spiral galaxies. Galaxies farther away from Earth than Andromeda, and it seems unlikely to be seen in such detail. The Hubble Space Telescope is a joint product of NASA and the European Space Agency, which entered Earth orbit in 1990 using the Discovery space shuttle. It would be unfortunate to look at images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope as just a collection of beautiful images. Has been in charge. Learn more about the world’s first space telescope in the following article. In addition, the activity of black holes in the Andromeda Galaxy has been closely studied. In late 2017, scientists unexpectedly discovered two supermassive black holes orbiting very close to each other. At the time, the study team acknowledged that these black holes were probably the “strongest pair” of all known masses.

Andromeda Galaxy

Milky Way Belt
Night view of the sky with the Milky Way glowing belt. The Andromeda Galaxy is 2.5 million light-years away and appears as a spindle of light several times the diameter of the full moon. This image was released on May 31, 2012. (Credits: NASA, European Space Agency)
In 2013, a search by the Chandra X-ray Telescope reported 26 objects that were candidates for black holes. This was the largest number of such candidates hunted in the galaxies around us. In 2016, the Chandra Telescope record was broken; When NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscope (NuSTAR), which was dedicated to observing X-rays, detected 40 black holes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.