dwarf planet Pluto

dwarf planet Pluto

Solar system

dwarf planet Pluto

dwarf planet Pluto – Pluto, once classified as the ninth and farthest planet from the Sun, is now the largest dwarf planet in the solar system. The planet is also one of the largest members of the Kuiper Belt; The belt is an area beyond Neptune orbit that is said to contain hundreds of thousands of icy and rocky masses, each measuring more than 100 kilometers; There is also a trillion comets in this belt. A spectacular view of Pluto was captured by the New Horizons space probe in July 2015. According to the Big Bang, in 2006, Pluto was classified as a dwarf planet. Many opposed the inclusion of Pluto among the planets of the solar system, and there was a heated debate about its place in scientific circles. The general public has not reached a consensus, and many do not recognize Pluto as a planet. In 2017, a team of scientists (including members of the New Horizon mission) came up with a new definition of a planet based on orbiting objects in space smaller than stars. This definition would increase the number of planets in the solar system from 8 to about 100.

In 1905, the American astronomer Percival Lowell observed the strange deviations he saw in the orbits of Neptune and Uranus and achieved the first signs of Pluto’s existence, dating back to 1905. He concluded that another celestial body would exert a force on the two planets. Lowell predicted the location of the mysterious planet in 1915 but was never able to find it. Clyde Tamba at the Lowell Observatory finally discovered the planet in 1930. In this regard, he used the predictions of Lowell and other astronomers. Pluto is named after 11-year-old Venetia Bernie of Oxford; The person who suggested to his grandfather that the new planet should have a name among the Roman gods. His grandfather mentioned the name at the Lowell Observatory. The Lowell Observatory has also been chosen for its appreciation of Lowell’s efforts. The first two letters of the name Percival Lowell are used on the planet, Pluto.

dwarf planet Pluto

physical characteristics – dwarf planet Pluto
Because Pluto is so far from Earth, little was known about the size or surface of the dwarf planet until 2015. Until the New Horizons space probe was able to reach close to Pluto in 2015. The spacecraft showed that Pluto has a diameter of 2370 km; That is, less than one-fifth the diameter of Earth. Observing the surface of Pluto by the New Horizons space probe revealed several features of its surface; For example, mountains that reach an altitude of 3500 meters. Although nitrogen and methane ice cover most of Pluto’s surface, these materials lack the strength to support such large peaks. Therefore, scientists have speculated that mountains form in the bedrock of blue ice. Pluto’s surface is covered in large amounts of methane ice, but New Horizons scientists have found significant differences in the way ice is reflected by ice on the dwarf planet’s surface. . Pluto also has special icy lands that are very similar to snakeskin. Astronomers observed similar areas in eroded mountainous areas. These types of Pluto structures are very large and their height is estimated up to 500 meters, while similar structures on Earth are only a few meters in size.

The life cycle of stars

Another distinctive feature of Pluto’s surface is the large heart-shaped region called the Tombaugh Regio region. The left side of the area (where the ice cream cone is shaped) is covered with carbon monoxide ice. Other changes and properties have been found in the composition of surface materials in this area. In the center and left of the Tambo area, there is a very flat area called Sputnik Planitia, which has no pit; The collision of ancient meteorites was expected to have created pits in the area. From the surface structure, it can be concluded that this area is very young and should not be more than 100 million years old. This region is probably still being formed and changing due to internal processes. These icy plains show dark layers that are only a few meters long. These lines are likely to have been created by strong winds blowing across the surface of the dwarf planet. Evidence from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope shows that the Pluto shell could contain complex organic molecules. The surface of Pluto is one of the coldest places in the solar system, where temperatures drop to minus 225 degrees Celsius. When we compare images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope with previous images, we find that the dwarf planet has become redder over time, which scientists attribute to seasonal changes.

dwarf planet Pluto

Pluto may also have a subsurface ocean, although scientists still need more data to support this claim. If there was a subsurface ocean, it could have a tremendous impact on Pluto’s history. For example, scientists found that the Sputnik Planitia region changed the direction of Pluto because of the amount of ice in that area. The ice was so heavy that it had an overall effect on Pluto. The New Horizons probe estimates that the ice is about 10 kilometers thick. Scientists consider the subsurface ocean to be the best explanation for the evidence; Although this scenario seems very unlikely, the thick ice sheet or the movements that occur in the rocks can play a major role in this process. If Pluto really had enough ocean fluid and energy, some scientists would think it could easily support life.

Orbital properties – dwarf planet Pluto
Pluto’s completely elliptical orbit makes the planet more than 49 times farther from the Sun than Earth. Because Pluto’s orbit is so eccentric, its distance from the Sun can vary considerably. Because of the planet’s great distance from Earth, scientists have little opportunity to study it. As the ninth planet in the solar system after 20 years of orbit, Pluto orbited Neptune in 1999 to become the farthest planet from the Sun; Until it was removed from the planet and classified as a dwarf planet. The surface of Pluto temporarily creates a thin atmosphere composed mainly of nitrogen and a small amount of methane. Pluto’s low gravity, which is slightly more than one-twentieth of Earth’s gravity, makes this atmosphere much taller than Earth’s. When the planet moves too far from the sun, its atmosphere is expected to freeze. But as long as Pluto has an atmosphere, it can experience very strong winds. The brightness of this planet is also very variable and it seems that gravitational waves affect it or the air that is blowing over the mountains.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.