The life of Solomon Beloz

The life of Solomon Beloz

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The life of Solomon Beloz

The life of Solomon Beloz In his writings, the novelist Blue Year valued the individuality and identity of mankind more than anything else, and with the help of his pen, he tried to eliminate what he called the fading of social values. “Blue Year” is considered one of the most prominent narrators of the post-war social situation in the United States. In his works, he combined concise “realism” with a wise intellectual framework refined by philosophy and the social sciences, as well as by European literary traditions.

The Hanging Man won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976. In her novels, Sal Blue typically dealt with eloquent and eloquent intellectuals: those who enjoyed being trapped. However, in The Adventures of Oggy March (1953), as his first “outstanding” work, and an interesting and entertaining novel, he showed his lively and adventurous spirit, a spirit that may have been influenced by the author’s childhood. It was in Chicago: a city that Blue himself described as a small world and a collection of the worst and best modern and industrial cities in America.

The life of Solomon Beloz

The life of Solomon Beloz

In the following years, as a professor at the University of Chicago, he viewed the country with a critical eye, and the fear and sadness of seeing an increase in the number of criminals from the lower social classes, the decline of scientific standards, and what led to his defeatism. Libertarian showed up in his later novels, such as “December Dean of the College” (1982).

The sharp tone that was present in all his works had caused criticism from everyone. “European observers sometimes think of me as a strange half-American-half-European hybrid whose works are full of rhetoric from philosophers, historians, and poets who have stored their books in their nest in Midwest,” Blue wrote. . I am definitely a self-taught person.

The life of Solomon Beloz

“Modern writers often say, ‘Blue lineage goes back to writers who have dignity.’ In 1944, Sal Blue published his first book, The Hanging Man: A Biography of a Young Man Who Just Graduated from a University and Was Stuck in Purgatory. The protagonist – Joseph – (without the last name and perhaps somewhat reminiscent of Joseph Ka Kafka) was an example of a passive, resilient, and quick-witted character who later became a regular character in Blue. “Victim” – a brief study of the relationship between a young New Yorker named Asa Lonthall and an anti-hero named Kirby Albie – was written in 1947. He was teaching at the University of Minnesota at the time.

In 1953, as promised to his readers, he finished writing The Adventures of Oggy March: a detailed account of the adventures of a modern Huckleberry Finn on his way to Wendy City. “I’m a Chicago man – a sad Chicago man – but I’ve loaded myself up with a different view of everything and nothing to do with existing definitions,” he said.

During his temporary stay in Europe – until the end of the 1940s – he worked on the story of the “Adventures of Oggy March” and despite living in Paris and having a charming atmosphere, he did not find this experience so perfect: It is not pleasant either. “When my dentist talks about one of Camus’ heaviest plays, I’m really scared.” Blue, who had already made a name for himself in the world of literature, did not give up his professorship while writing and returned to the University of Chicago to become a member of the Social Thought Committee.

He wrote, “Find the Tail” in 1956 and “Henderson the King of Rain” three years later. In 1964, Herzog Blue, to everyone’s disbelief, won the title of the best-selling book of the year, which is in fact one of his best and most successful works. The protagonist, Herzog, depressed and helpless, a university professor

Blue Year LifeThe author of the book The School of Romantic Art and Christianity – who had just separated from his wife – wrote many letters to friends, distant acquaintances, Nietzsche, and God. But even Herzog’s knowledge and literacy did not help him cope with the bitter truth of his wife’s escape from his best friend. According to many, the book was based on the life of Blue and his second wife, Alexandra Chakbasov. But the author himself claimed: “Herzog’s book is a humorous novel. “I wrote it at a time when I enjoyed losing educated Americans.” He later added: “By writing this novel, I wanted to show the lack of application of ‘higher education in the life of an unfortunate person who eventually realizes that his literacy is useless in everyday matters.”

The life of Solomon Beloz

As one of the first authors of the literary-social quarterly “Partizan Review”, he expressed his disgust with anti-cultural movements in the book “Mr. Summers’ Planet” (1970). The low-key protagonist, a one-eyed man and the only survivor of the Nazi concentration camp, watched the growing decline of New York City’s moral values ​​with a look of humiliation and disbelief: “From this perspective, even the affluent part of the city is like an It was an Asian or African city.

The life of Solomon Beloz In 1989, he married his fifth wife, Janice Friedman, a student at his Chicago think tank. “It all makes sense” was a collection of short stories published in 1994. A year later, Blue became seriously ill due to severe food poisoning during a cruise to the Caribbean. In 1997, while hospitalized, he wrote the short novel “The Real,” which received mixed reviews from critics. He continued to write in the eighties of his life. In 2000, he published Rowelstein, a novel in which he described his experience of food poisoning, and a year later released his collection of short stories. Although Blue was isolated in public, his friends said he was humorous in more intimate gatherings.

The life of Solomon Beloz

His over-indulgence in the sport of ice hockey may have stemmed from his Canadian roots. Sal Blue spent the last years of his life with his fifth wife and children – a daughter and three sons, one of whom was the son of his first marriage and the other two of his second marriage. Born on June 10, 1915, the novelist Blue of the Year died on April 5, 2005, at the age of 89.

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